Resisting Hail with SPF Roofing


In the words of renowned expert Richard Fricklas, former director of the Roofing Industry’s Educational Institute (RIEI), “There seems to be a mindset among some roofing contractors, as well as building owners and designers, that foam roofs are not suitable for hail regions at all.” According to Fricklas, however, the material has an excellent story to tell when it comes to wind and hail resistance.

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Caring for glazed architectural terra cotta


One of the most prevalent materials found on historic buildings, glazed architectural terra cotta was popularized in the late 19th century as a versatile, lightweight, economical, and adaptable alternative to stone. Through the 1930s, the sculptural properties of terra cotta gave rise to diverse architectural styles, including the Chicago School, High Rise, and Beaux Arts.

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Wood brings density, reduced cost, and performance to mid-rise design

The Stella in Marina del Rey, California is constructed of a wood frame in one of the highest seismic areas in the country. Photo courtesy Lawrence Anderson,

As multi-family developers and design teams strive to increase urban density in a way that is affordable, wood framing continues to appear as a popular material choice. For the Stella luxury development in Marina del Rey, California, an innovative light wood-frame design allowed the team to stay within budget, while still meeting code requirements, and providing resort-style amenities in one of the highest seismic areas of the country.

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Using modern wood for historic restoration

Accoya_Oakleigh_Church 1

When it comes to historic preservation projects, architects and installers can find themselves at a loss. Wood is the most traditional material, but also notoriously unstable. It has a tendency to warp and becomes vulnerable to rot, decay, and insects. Some replacement products are more durable, but far from historically accurate, such as aluminum-framed windows.

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Tuning into sound masking technology


From their early uses in commercial offices to relatively newer applications such as patient rooms in hospitals, sound masking systems are becoming a more common component of interior design. This technology distributes an engineered background sound throughout a facility, raising its ambient level in a controlled fashion.

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