01 00 00 General Requirements

Category Archives: 01 00 00 General Requirements

A Paradigm Shift in Specifying Temporary Structures

All images courtesy Mahaffey Fabric Structures

This article for construction specifiers assesses why and when to consider temporary buildings as an alternative to permanent construction, renovation, or leased existing space. Decision-making criteria, including category options, financial and site considerations, as well as technical information on energy-efficiency, usable space, roof loads, and wind ratings are examined.

Read More

Commissioning a LEED Platinum Science Building

Photo courtesy Bohlin, Cywinski, Jackson

Discussing specification writing and documentation details can be challenging, but the right set of specifications is a key component in the process to deliver a successful project. It is crucial the specification writer understands the intent of how systems will operate and how systems relate to each other. This is getting even more important as new buildings are getting more complex and have loftier energy efficiency goals. This article describes the most important aspects of construction specifications to ensure a good outcome for energy efficient buildings.

Read More

Testing Glazing in the Field: Performance Classes

Up until the 2008 edition of American Architectural Manufacturers Association/Window and Door Manufacturers Association/Canadian Standards Association (AAMA/WDMA/CSA) 101/I.S.2/A440, North American Fenestration Standard/Specification for Windows, Doors, and Skylights (NAFS), there were five performances classes of windows with differing requirements for test pressures, allowed leakage rates, and other variables. This sidebar discusses the current four types, and their minimum performance grades.

Read More

Testing Glazing in the Field: Specifying procedures now avoids trouble later

Photo © Bruce Damonte. Photo courtesy Wausau

Laboratory testing of fenestration products to the North American Fenestration Standard/Specification for Windows, Doors, and Skylights (NAFS) verifies the performance of a specimen of the fenestration product itself. How can one be certain the specified performance will be realized after installation? When properly applied, field testing can be a useful way to verify actual installed performance during construction and prior to occupancy of a building. The key is testing in conditions that accurately simulate the real-world environment and ensuring that the appropriate test method is applied to the specific installation.

Read More

Preserving 10 Light Street’s Exterior Façade with Restoration

Photos courtesy RMF Engineering

Built in the late 1920s, the Art Deco 10 Light Street is the first skyscraper in Baltimore. A detailed façade inspection was recently completed using 29 swing stage drops for close access—this led to a restoration project for the more than 325 m2 (3500 sf) of Italian marble, replacing it with a durable quartzite from Brazil. This article examines what occurred during the reconstruction.

Read More

Specifying Movement Joints and Sealants for Tile and Stone: Reviewing current industry standards and design options

Photo courtesy Florida Tile

When there is a tile or stone failure, a contributing factor is often the lack of properly installed movement joints. Just like concrete sidewalks and bridges, tile and stone need to have movement joints to control the anticipated movements within a structure. Tile and stone will expand and contract when it is subjected to heat/cold or moisture/dryness. It is critical for architects to properly specify the design, materials, and layouts of movement joints.

Read More