Cold-formed steel design standards

steel_CEMCO 1 - Plaza at Pearl City

Since the development of the first specifications for cold-formed steel (CFS) building construction in 1946, the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) has been working to develop design standards to improve performance and accessibility for designers and structural engineers. These standards have progressed over the years to incorporate the latest technologies in materials and design.

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Defining and Refining Polished Concrete

Hiperfloor premium reflectiveHC550-0142

French-American architect Paul Philippe Cret once said, “Of the many doorways we pass in a short walk, most are fulfilling their purpose, most of them are well-enough built. [But] how many are worth a second look?” Cannot the same be said about architectural polished concrete? Are your floors meeting your design intent or did you settle? Do you know how to distinguish between the floor you asked for, and the floor being presented to you during the punch list?

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More on duplex stainless steel and bridges

Pedelta’s Cala Galdana Bridge in Menorca, Spain, uses duplex 2205 stainless steel structural components. Photo © Juan Sobrino

In the May 2015 issue of The Construction Specifier, Catherine Houska, CSI, discussed how duplex stainless steels are being specified for numerous structural applications. This complementary web piece looks at a few additional projects from around the world that make use of this versatile material’s attributes.

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Specifying Wall Cladding Fasteners


Curtain walls are often the focal point of aesthetic design for a multi-story building. Behind the attractive façade are the pedestrian, yet arguably more important, functional components that ensure safety and reliability—fasteners that transfer loads both imposed and experienced by the assembly to the building’s structural framework.

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Duplex Stainless Steel Revolutionizes Structural Design

duplex_San Diego 01-Cropped Kaplan

Architectural and engineering firms are increasingly exploring stainless steel’s possibilities as a structural material as new research, structural codes, and design guides become available. Most designs have used the familiar Types 304L or 316L alloys from the austenitic family of stainless steels, but for all but the lightest sections, the duplex stainless steel family presents a much greater potential for innovation.

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