Using modern wood for historic restoration

Accoya_Oakleigh_Church 1

When it comes to historic preservation projects, architects and installers can find themselves at a loss. Wood is the most traditional material, but also notoriously unstable. It has a tendency to warp and becomes vulnerable to rot, decay, and insects. Some replacement products are more durable, but far from historically accurate, such as aluminum-framed windows.

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Defining and Refining Polished Concrete

Hiperfloor premium reflectiveHC550-0142

French-American architect Paul Philippe Cret once said, “Of the many doorways we pass in a short walk, most are fulfilling their purpose, most of them are well-enough built. [But] how many are worth a second look?” Cannot the same be said about architectural polished concrete? Are your floors meeting your design intent or did you settle? Do you know how to distinguish between the floor you asked for, and the floor being presented to you during the punch list?

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Vision Reborn: Modern FRP composites restore ornamental masonry


Sometimes, the best way to restore an historic building is not the way it was originally built. The methods and materials of construction have changed, and newer options are available to re-create the original design. Labor-intensive approaches of a century ago are now prohibitively expensive. This
 is especially true in the case of decorative details, which were sometimes hand-made.

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Designing All-wood Podiums


Wood ‘podium’ construction takes an age-old material and moves it into the 21st century. Structures retain sought-after features—beauty, familiarity, and carbon sequestration—while soaring to greater heights and achieving sometimes dramatic cost savings.

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Specifying Structural Framing Systems


Many factors come into play when designers specify structural framing. There are so many criteria, sometimes there is no absolute answer as to which framing system would perform best. At the same time, the interests of various parties must be served, meaning the final selection does not always rest with the structural engineer.

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