From jail to hotel: Windows that work

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When baseball superstar Babe Ruth toured Boston’s Charles Street Jail in 1925, he famously quipped: “This isn’t a jail, it’s a hotel”—a prophecy that has since come true. Now known as the Liberty Hotel, this 298-room, high-end hospitality destination retains its architectural heritage with its famed rotunda, jail-themed bars and restaurants, and its historically accurate replacement windows.

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Fire-protective glass and increased color clarity

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Modern architectural designs favor open spaces and natural light throughout large buildings. Now, even enclosed interior areas like offices, corridors, and stairwells are using interior glass to open up otherwise windowless spaces. This requires fire-protective glazing that offers not only life safety, but also visual and color clarity.

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Channel high design

Single-glazed, staggered channel glass segments screen views while allowing for natural air ventilation.

As design professionals have grown more familiar with channel glass, many now recognize its benefits extend beyond harnessing daylight. The linear channel glass segments provide a depth and profile not found in conventional glazing, and can therefore be used as much to contribute to the art of building design as to diffuse daylight. The first in this three-part series explores the material.

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Protecting those inside: Specifying blast hazard-mitigating windows

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Exposed to the extreme pressure released by an explosive mass, elements of the window or curtain wall assembly work together to withstand the blast load and dissipate its energy. Laminated glass takes the brunt of the blast force, the framing connections and glass bites work together to keep the lites in their frames, the mullions and sashes adequately deflect to handle the assembly’s changing shape, and window hardware transfers load to perimeter framing.

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Innovative glazing technologies are changing the future of buildings

The Mathilda Project

It is no secret architects have an affinity for glass. The sheer number of full-glass buildings emerging all over the United States speaks to the material’s panoptic appeal and its ability to create openness and connectivity to the outdoors. Most of our time—approximately 90 percent—is spent inside, meaning an exposure to natural light and a visual connection with the outdoors is more important than ever.

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