Channel high design

Single-glazed, staggered channel glass segments screen views while allowing for natural air ventilation.

As design professionals have grown more familiar with channel glass, many now recognize its benefits extend beyond harnessing daylight. The linear channel glass segments provide a depth and profile not found in conventional glazing, and can therefore be used as much to contribute to the art of building design as to diffuse daylight. The first in this three-part series explores the material.

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Defining and Refining Polished Concrete

Hiperfloor premium reflectiveHC550-0142

French-American architect Paul Philippe Cret once said, “Of the many doorways we pass in a short walk, most are fulfilling their purpose, most of them are well-enough built. [But] how many are worth a second look?” Cannot the same be said about architectural polished concrete? Are your floors meeting your design intent or did you settle? Do you know how to distinguish between the floor you asked for, and the floor being presented to you during the punch list?

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Protecting those inside: Specifying blast hazard-mitigating windows


Exposed to the extreme pressure released by an explosive mass, elements of the window or curtain wall assembly work together to withstand the blast load and dissipate its energy. Laminated glass takes the brunt of the blast force, the framing connections and glass bites work together to keep the lites in their frames, the mullions and sashes adequately deflect to handle the assembly’s changing shape, and window hardware transfers load to perimeter framing.

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Innovative glazing technologies are changing the future of buildings

The Mathilda Project

It is no secret architects have an affinity for glass. The sheer number of full-glass buildings emerging all over the United States speaks to the material’s panoptic appeal and its ability to create openness and connectivity to the outdoors. Most of our time—approximately 90 percent—is spent inside, meaning an exposure to natural light and a visual connection with the outdoors is more important than ever.

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Are We Thinking About Daylighting All Wrong?

The daylighting advantages for this Manassas Park classroom go far beyond reducing reliance on electrical utilities—there is much to be said about natural light’s benefits in health and productivity. Photo © Sam Kittner Photography

Daylighting is an integral part of architectural design. After all, building occupants want a physical and psychological connection to the outside world. We evolved under sunlight; our Circadian rhythms—governing daily living cycles, influencing our mood, and controlling our sleep patterns—developed in response to a connection to the outdoors. Unfortunately, how many design/construction professionals approach daylighting can be problematic.

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