09 30 00 Tiling

Category Archives: 09 30 00 Tiling

Specifying the Right Grout for the Job

Specifiers typically select the grout for their tile project based on general performance characteristics, color, warranty, and cost. Despite this, less-than-optimal products are often used. Some do not fully understand the changes in grout technology and do not realize they have a choice. Not all grout is the same, and, of course, color is only one small factor in the overall performance.

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Richardsville Elementary – NET ZERO

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September 2010 marked the grand opening for Richardsville Elementary, the First Net-Zero Insulated Concrete Form School in the U.S. Warren County School district, the school board responsible for Richardsville, has been building energy efficient schools that are being recognized for their innovation across the United States.

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Specifying Movement Joints and Sealants for Tile and Stone: Reviewing current industry standards and design options

Photo courtesy Florida Tile

When there is a tile or stone failure, a contributing factor is often the lack of properly installed movement joints. Just like concrete sidewalks and bridges, tile and stone need to have movement joints to control the anticipated movements within a structure. Tile and stone will expand and contract when it is subjected to heat/cold or moisture/dryness. It is critical for architects to properly specify the design, materials, and layouts of movement joints.

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Testing the Test: Water Repellents

Water repellents can be confusing, from the imprecise terminology (i.e. sealers versus coatings versus sealants) to the wide variety of chemistries available. There can also be a stigma associated with repellents—many consultants are concerned about negative side effects from applying a material to the outside of a porous material, potentially impeding vapor drive from the interior.

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Testing the Test: Water Absorption with RILEM Tubes

All images courtesy Building Diagnostics Inc.

RILEM tubes can be used to assess a substrate’s resistance to water absorption, to compare the absorption before and after treatment with a water repellent, and to evaluate the durability of a repellent by periodically measuring absorption. Although widely used by the construction industry, there is currently no industry standard available describing exactly how to perform the test. Small changes in the testing procedure may lead to different results, including how to attach the tube, how to fill it, and at which intervals to perform the readings. Standardization would improve the uniform interpretation of results.

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