People Who Work in Glass Houses: Sound masking for modern conference rooms

Cover-Glass-Room-Option-02

Privacy has all but vanished from the modern glass conference room and from much of the open-plan commercial office space. While additional frosting, static films, or vertical blinds can return some small measure of visual privacy, restoring speech privacy through acoustic treatment takes more knowledge, finesse, and careful specification. Acoustic treatment, after all, is not really ‘sound-proofing’ or ‘noise-cancelling.’

Read More

Providing Acoustical Flexibility: Getting ‘active’ at Wartburg College

acoustics_1M9A3015

Superior musicians demand the best from themselves. Facilities with the proper acoustics can support musicians’ artistry, helping to elevate performances to the highest level. To improve the sound quality of its chapel-auditorium, Wartburg College chose a new technological solution—an active acoustics system. The school, which is located in Waverly, Iowa, premiered the system in October 2015.

Read More

Controlling mechanical system noise

bigstock-Air-Conditioning-86902088

A typical urban and suburban environment has numerous sources contributing to the exterior ambient noise. Among these are the environmental sounds from a building’s heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning equipment. How can design professionals help mitigate the distraction caused by HVAC?

Read More

Building Quieter: Achieving the fine line between aesthetics and acoustics in wall and ceiling specifications

1 Overall View

Design/construction teams are constantly balancing the desire for a high-quality look and feel with adherence to acoustical requirements and project budgets. This is especially true when it comes to wall and ceiling choices. Whether selecting from basic wall and ceiling panels or custom woodwork, noise is a primary consideration—no matter how it looks, it has to perform.

Read More

Creating a collaborative workspace without breaking the peace

Meeting Room

The rise of the cubicle in the 1960s and ’70s began from a desire for private workspaces. They became so popular that offices used to look like cubicle farms, until these row-upon-row ‘bullpens’ began to draw criticism for their appearance and their limitations on peer interaction and collaboration. Over time, the walls came down and cubicles were abandoned to make workplaces more open and friendly.

Read More

Blocking exterior noise sources

New England Conservatory Jordan Hall_Acentech_photo credit Robyn Ivy

Whether at work or home, indoor acoustic comfort requires freedom from unwanted sound. Exposure to elevated noise levels may disrupt sleep and interfere with activities requiring concentration. Left uncontrolled, long-term exposure to noise levels not otherwise considered hazardous can lead to stress.

Read More