Creating a Collaborative Workspace Without Breaking the Peace

Meeting Room

The rise of the cubicle in the 1960s and ’70s began from a desire for private workspaces. They became so popular that offices used to look like cubicle farms, until these row-upon-row ‘bullpens’ began to draw criticism for their appearance and their limitations on peer interaction and collaboration. Over time, the walls came down and cubicles were abandoned to make workplaces more open and friendly.

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The Value in Standardizing Door Schedules

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by Melany Whalin, CSI
Horror stories abound among hardware consultants who have been called in at the last minute to create hardware specifications that were needed yesterday, only to be given incomplete or inaccurate door schedules on which to base their specifications.

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Blocking exterior noise sources

New England Conservatory Jordan Hall_Acentech_photo credit Robyn Ivy

Whether at work or home, indoor acoustic comfort requires freedom from unwanted sound. Exposure to elevated noise levels may disrupt sleep and interfere with activities requiring concentration. Left uncontrolled, long-term exposure to noise levels not otherwise considered hazardous can lead to stress.

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Designing Sound Isolation in Multi-family Living

Acoustic_Rendering Twenty 20 Credit CBT Architects

Imagine moving into a new condo, only to realize the TV next door, the dog barking across the hall, and the neighbors walking around upstairs can all be easily heard. Acoustical consultants would love to help, but unfortunately there is little that can be done at this stage without significant cost and intrusion. Sound isolation issues are most effectively addressed before construction, during the design phase.

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Improving Floor/Ceiling Sound Control in Multifamily Projects: Sound Testing Practices

The sound transmission class (STC) and impact insulation class (IIC) are ASTM-derived single number ratings that try to quantify how much sound a stopped by partition being tested. Laboratory testing involves an ideal setting for the floor/ceiling assembly—it is isolated from the walls, and there are no penetrations for HVAC, plumbing lines, sprinklers, can lights, or electrical boxes. In the field (i.e. F-STC and F-IIC), the floor/ceiling assembly often sits on load-bearing walls, is connected to the structure, and contains many ceiling and floor penetrations for the items just mentioned. Consequently, the code allows for a lower rating for field scores over those in the lab.

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Improving Floor/Ceiling Sound Control in Multifamily Projects

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Demand for better floor/ceiling acoustics in multifamily construction has been spurred by consumer desires, new guidelines from code bodies, and stricter enforcement of existing codes. This article reviews important new guidelines, delving into how construction manufacturers have created new products or enhanced existing ones in the pursuit of achieving higher acoustical performance.

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