11 00 00 Equipment

Category Archives: 11 00 00 Equipment

ASTM Standards for Correctional Facilities

There have been numerous standards sponsored by ASTM Committee F-33 on Detention and Correctional Facilities. Familiarity and being able to adhere to these standards is a must. They not only cover testing procedures and degree of detention, but also assemblies and fastening methods that must be incorporated into the design and construction.

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Richardsville Elementary – NET ZERO

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September 2010 marked the grand opening for Richardsville Elementary, the First Net-Zero Insulated Concrete Form School in the U.S. Warren County School district, the school board responsible for Richardsville, has been building energy efficient schools that are being recognized for their innovation across the United States.

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Specifying Successful Systems for Detention Facilities

Photo © Bo Parker

The construction of detention and correctional facilities can be complex. In addition to standard construction materials and practice, these buildings are designed with a multitude of special materials and systems, known collectively as ‘detention equipment.’ This article focuses on the use of detention equipment contractors (DEC) when building correctional facilities.

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Designing to Prevent Infection

Photo © BigStockPhoto/Frank Boston

U.S. healthcare organizations increasingly face the most daunting medical challenge since the pre-antibiotic age thanks to an aging population and ever-increasing multi-drug resistant and environmentally adaptive pathogens. Architects and designers have an important role in providing successful patient care. They may design an environment that inadvertently accumulates, propagates, and circulates pathogens or one which is the best ally in continually mitigating the bioburden that spreads disease. What should be done?

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Impactable Dock Doors Help Increase Safety in Warehouses

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Warehouse doors can help increase safety by helping protect the integrity of the floor. They are designed to prevent the elements from the entering the facility, and reduce the threat of condensation from creating a slipping/tripping hazard for those on foot or those trying to quickly maneuver forklifts in tight areas. They also serve to reduce impact accidents and injuries by absorbing ‘hits.’ To ensure the right assembly, there are numerous high-pressure and missile-impact tests that demonstrate the strength of the doors—important for facing up to high winds.

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Impactable Dock Doors: Florida Building Code (FBC) 1715.5.3, “Exterior Door Assemblies”

Exterior door assemblies not covered by Florida Building Code (FBC) 1715.5.2, “Exterior Windows, Siding, and Patio Glass,” or FBC 1715.5.3.1, “Exterior Door Assemblies,” shall be tested for structural integrity in accordance with Procedure A of ASTM E330, Standard Test Method for Structural Performance of Exterior Windows, Doors, Skylight,s and Curtain Walls by Uniform Static Air Pressure Difference, at a load of 1.5 times the required design pressure load. The load shall be sustained for 10 seconds with no permanent deformation of any main frame or panel member in excess of 0.4 percent of its span after the load is removed. The design pressures, as determined from American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) 7, Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures, are permitted to be multiplied by 0.6. High-velocity hurricane zones (HVHZ) must comply with Testing Application Standard (TAS) 202. After each specified loading, there must be no glass breakage, permanent damage to fasteners, hardware parts, or any other damage that causes the door to be inoperable.

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