B10−Superstructure

Category Archives: B10−Superstructure

Design of Fire-resistive Exposed Wood Members

Photo courtesy Structurlam

The article offers an in-depth look at design considerations for fire resistance when building with wood products. It also looks at wood engineering mechanics and design procedures that comply with the International Building Code (IBC), recognizing fire resistance demonstrated by structural wood beams and columns in actual fires.

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Getting on Deck: High-performance options for composite decking

Photo courtesy MoistureShield

Since the late 1980s, manufacturers have introduced dozens of wood-plastic composite decking products, including composite boards with thin plastic caps (i.e. capped composites) in recent years. Composite decking manufacturing methods vary, resulting in deck boards with significantly different performance characteristics. Several composite brands have experienced field failures, but newly advanced products are proving promising against demanding exposures. Specifying durable and attractive composite decking requires attention to key physical traits, including moisture absorption, and insect resistance.

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Specifying Steel Fibers for Concrete Floors

Photo © BigStockPhoto/Jacek Sopotnicki

Thin, short strands of steel are being increasingly specified as reinforcement in ground-supported slabs and in composite steel deck-slabs. Structural engineers are still figuring out how best to design with these components, but specifiers need to think about how to define this material in the contract documents. Dosage is critical, for one thing, but not all fibers are alike. Without specifying other key details, one can end up with concrete that contains the specified mass of fibers, but does not fulfill the designer’s intentions.

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Making Sense of Sprayed Polyurethane Foam

All photos courtesy Spray Foam Coalition

For decades, the U.S. design and construction industry has turned to sprayed polyurethane foam to insulate and air seal buildings. When used as a roofing material, its monolithic nature allows for a seamless, self-flashing application that can keep out water. SPF can also improve energy efficiency, helping building owners and general contractors comply with energy codes and meet performance requirements for green building programs and certifications.

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Building Tall with Wood in the Future

All images courtesy CEI Architecture

There is growing movement among leading architects to embrace wood as a structural replacement for concrete and steel in mid‐rise and even high‐rise projects. The exploration of new engineered and hybrid technologies is leaving industry visionaries expecting to see high‐rise wood structures within their lifetime. Further, as the effects of global warming become more evident, alternative methods of construction need to be explored. One option is to maximize the use of wood. An example is illustrated in CEI Architecture’s designs for a proposed 40-story office building—a unique structure addressing issues of creating effective and attractive working environments that are appealing to a broad cross section of the working public.

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G8WAY DC: Innovative UHPC Elements

Photo © Vic Tucker

Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) provides strength, ductility, durability, and aesthetic design flexibility while still being highly moldable and able to replicate texture, form, and shape. It is this combination of superior properties that also provides architects and engineers with a new kind of freedom—to design unique, unprecedented UHPC architectural elements that are also sustainable and extremely durable.

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