Solid timber, solid construction performance

Forte_Credited

Solid timber construction, sometimes called ‘mass timber,’ is an emerging set of engineered wood products—massive planar or frame elements used for walls, floors, roofs, partitions, and core elements of a building. As shown in Figure 1, examples include both glued configurations liked glued-laminated timber (glulam), structural composite lumber (SCL), and cross-laminated timber (CLT), as well as non-glued products like dowel-laminated timber (DLT); nail-laminated timber (NLT), cross-nail-laminated timber (CNLT), and interlocking cross-laminated timber (ICLT).

Read More

Specifying and achieving a level composite steel floor

floor_Overall photo 3

Composite steel assemblies are an efficient and popular structural option for floor construction. Figure 1 shows a typical assembly, consisting of a steel beam, metal deck, concrete slab, and shear connectors. The composite action between the steel beam and concrete provided by shear connectors creates the composite properties that make the system a very stiff and strong structural element.

Read More

Fluid-applied thermal break coatings 101

4

Architects designing with concrete balconies, cantilevered beams, roof penetrations, parapets, canopies, spandrel glass, and other ornamental architectural features are often limited in executing these design elements because they can create thermal bridges that extend beyond the insulation systems within the building envelope. This can cause condensation buildup in exterior systems and significant loss of energy performance for the whole building.

Read More

Cold-formed steel design standards

steel_CEMCO 1 - Plaza at Pearl City

Since the development of the first specifications for cold-formed steel (CFS) building construction in 1946, the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) has been working to develop design standards to improve performance and accessibility for designers and structural engineers. These standards have progressed over the years to incorporate the latest technologies in materials and design.

Read More

Using modern wood for historic restoration

Accoya_Oakleigh_Church 1

When it comes to historic preservation projects, architects and installers can find themselves at a loss. Wood is the most traditional material, but also notoriously unstable. It has a tendency to warp and becomes vulnerable to rot, decay, and insects. Some replacement products are more durable, but far from historically accurate, such as aluminum-framed windows.

Read More