Designing better commercial fenestration through thermal design

AAMA-Intertek_5694

Fenestration—such as windows, curtain walls, window walls, sloped glazing, storefronts, and doors—affects building energy use through four basic mechanisms: thermal heat transfer, solar heat gain, visible transmittance, and air leakage. Product designers, architects, and specifiers must reconcile the interplay of these factors to arrive at, or verify, optimal thermal performance.

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Protecting our historic glazing

historic_opener

According to the National Park Service (NPS), “when historic windows exist, they should be repaired when possible. When they are too deteriorated to repair, selection of the replacement windows must be guided by Standard 6 [of the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation].”

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Understanding heat, air, and moisture control

Photo © Bigstock.com

Many designers and specifiers understand controlling air, vapor, and thermal transfer helps mitigate moisture problems within the building envelope. Moisture accumulation is a performance adversary that can lead to structural deterioration, finish damage, organic growth, and reduced building longevity.

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Layering security controls for healthcare projects

Looking down a hospital hall way lights

It is not difficult to imagine the need for security in healthcare environments. Where are the eyes and ears ensuring the safety of a newborn transported from labor and delivery? Can family members visiting a sick relative be confident their valuables are safe at bedside if they leave to grab a snack? What security precautions are taken when a rear exterior door to the hospital is propped open so staff can take a break?

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Aesthetics versus function: Resolving issues with exposed drip-edge flashing on masonry walls

Photos © Robert Benson Photography

Designers are creating new and exciting contemporary masonry designs that demand clean, smooth wall plane elevations. One challenge that can interfere with unobstructed aesthetics is the visual effects of masonry drip-edge flashing. This potential obstacle has also carried through to traditional masonry design. Designers and specifiers can find it difficult to balance design and functional water management requirements.

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