Using modern wood for historic restoration

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When it comes to historic preservation projects, architects and installers can find themselves at a loss. Wood is the most traditional material, but also notoriously unstable. It has a tendency to warp and becomes vulnerable to rot, decay, and insects. Some replacement products are more durable, but far from historically accurate, such as aluminum-framed windows.

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Defining and Refining Polished Concrete

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French-American architect Paul Philippe Cret once said, “Of the many doorways we pass in a short walk, most are fulfilling their purpose, most of them are well-enough built. [But] how many are worth a second look?” Cannot the same be said about architectural polished concrete? Are your floors meeting your design intent or did you settle? Do you know how to distinguish between the floor you asked for, and the floor being presented to you during the punch list?

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Throwing a curve into designs with bent insulating glass

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Bent glass is a trend that has worked its way from sculptures and interior décor to becoming a major component of buildings’ exteriors. A modern, aesthetically pleasing design element, this glazing literally throws a curve into a façade, making people look twice and admire its unique structure. However, building professionals working with bent insulating glass (IG) must understand the process is as much a science as it is an art.

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The hazards of traditional wired glass


For decades, traditional wired glass—with its crisscrossed wires creating diamonds or squares—was installed in buildings around the world. Thanks to its ability to remain intact even when broken, it was the first and, for years, only form of glazing available for fire door assemblies in schools, hospitals, and other buildings.

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Managing Daylighting with Shading


Skylights are effective for allowing daylight into buildings. However, this needs to be properly managed to ensure spaces are not flooded with too much daylight and the risk of glare is mitigated. The amount of solar radiation coming through horizontal and inclined glazing is much greater than vertical façades, and this can cause significant heat gain issues.

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