Tag Archives: 07 27 00–Air Barriers

Sound-deadening with Sprayfoam: Adding unexpected value with SPF


Insulating walls with low-pressure sprayed polyurethane foam (SPF) is a common practice among builders and architects for various reasons—such as increased energy efficiency, structural support, and overall comfort. One of the ways SPF can increase the comfort of a structure is through the material’s sound-deadening properties, which contractors can employ to bring additional value to a project.

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Using Vapor Retarders to Manage Airflow and Reduce Moisture


Industry codes are tightening the building envelope and increasing the required R-value of walls. This is a good thing for energy savings and thermal comfort. Yet, one change to a building’s system sets forth a series of other changes. The tight-envelope construction techniques to which architects and builders are now required to adhere have led to a steep reduction in air movement through walls.

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Draining the Rain: Advancements in engineered rainscreen walls


Over the years, there has been a tremendous amount of innovation in the building industry—still, the ability to achieve a waterproof wall system still eludes design/construction professionals. If the wall is not properly designed, this moisture will remain trapped causing numerous issues, such as the corrosion of structural reinforcing, and the proliferation of rot and mold.

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Making Sense of Sprayed Polyurethane Foam

All photos courtesy Spray Foam Coalition

For decades, the U.S. design and construction industry has turned to sprayed polyurethane foam to insulate and air seal buildings. When used as a roofing material, its monolithic nature allows for a seamless, self-flashing application that can keep out water. SPF can also improve energy efficiency, helping building owners and general contractors comply with energy codes and meet performance requirements for green building programs and certifications.

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Detailing Masonry and Frame walls with Continuous Insulation and Air Barriers

Photo courtesy Sto Corp.

Both conductive heat transfer and air leakage through the building enclosure have been identified as obstacles to truly energy efficient buildings. This article delves into the necessity for proper detailing of both continuous insulation and fluid-applied air barriers, pointing out the difficulties in avoiding pitfalls such as thermal bridging in wall assemblies. It also explores why more insulation is not necessarily a means to increase energy efficiency.

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