Designing spandrel glass

Among the many reasons architects specify glass are its beauty and versatility. In addition to offering the full spectrum of transparency, color, and high environmental performance as vision glass components, this material can be opacified in spandrels to create visual flair.
+ Read More

Specifying the right privacy and shading

When specifying glazing solutions for vision, sound, light, and heat control, design actions often come down to a choice between integrated louvers and integrated blinds. Knowing the difference between the two—and which option may be more suitable for an application—
is critical.
+ Read More

In or out?

While security windows and detention windows may seem to serve the same purpose, the major difference comes down to whether you intend to keep the threat in or to keep it out.
+ Read More


Fire-protective glass and increased color clarity

Modern architectural designs favor open spaces and natural light throughout large buildings. Now, even enclosed interior areas like offices, corridors, and stairwells are using interior glass to open up otherwise windowless spaces. This requires fire-protective glazing that offers not only life safety, but also visual and color clarity.
+ Read More

The hazards of traditional wired glass

For decades, traditional wired glass—with its crisscrossed wires creating diamonds or squares—was installed in buildings around the world. Thanks to its ability to remain intact even when broken, it was the first and, for years, only form of glazing available for fire door assemblies in schools, hospitals, etc.
+ Read More