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December 27, 2018

Briefly…

San Francisco tower wins five tall building awards

San Francisco tower wins five tall building awards

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) has announced the winners of its 2019 awards program. The 181 Fremont Tower in San Francisco is the recipient in five categories.

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Harvard professor wins AIA education award

Harvard professor wins AIA education award

Toshiko Mori, professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, is the recipient of the 2019 American Institute of Architects (AIA) Topaz Medallion for Excellence in Architectural Education.

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Free e-book looks at retrofitting HVAC systems

Free e-book looks at retrofitting HVAC systems

In the latest edition of a series of free, downloadable e-books, an article from The Construction Specifier explains how HVAC upgrades can help reduce energy consumption and costs in educational facilities.

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Big Box
Snøhetta revises renovation plans for landmark NY tower

Snøhetta revises renovation plans for landmark NY tower

Earlier this month, the ownership team of 550 Madison in New York announced a new design for the landmark destination. The revised renovation plans will reinforce a preservation-driven rehabilitation of the tower.

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Features

Corrosion-resistant finishes for high-traffic projects

Corrosion-resistant finishes for high-traffic projects

The risk of corrosion should be a key consideration when specifying finishes for a building envelope’s architectural aluminum products. Regardless of the project’s proximity to the sea, transportation facilities, transit-oriented developments (TODs), and many other high-traffic city centers can present significant challenges in protecting exterior-facing elements that are made of architectural aluminum.

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Preserving architectural treasures in New York’s historic districts

The 19th century left New York City with a remarkable legacy of cast-iron architecture. This style has experienced a renaissance in recent decades with the restoration of several landmark buildings. Restoring these 150- to 160-year-old landmark buildings is a major endeavor. In addition to rusting and damage of the façade’s decorative metal, a close inspection often reveals hidden conditions such as broken connections anchoring cast-iron assemblies to the building and points of leakage. The scope of work often requires the removal, replication, and reattachment of thousands of cast-iron and sheet metal features treated with high-performance primers and coatings to maximize long-lasting protection and aesthetics.

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Project News

Baltimore park promotes sustainable living

Baltimore park promotes sustainable living

Eager Park in Baltimore, Maryland, has been revitalized. Designed by Mahan Rykiel and Gensler Architects, the 2.4-ha (6-acre) public space near the Johns Hopkins Hospital is intended to be the centerpiece of the community’s health and wellness and a space where residents, hospital/research workers, and visitors can socialize, exercise, relax, and play.

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Events

January 22-25
World of Concrete

January 22-25
The International Surface Event (TISE)

February 4-7
Sprayfoam Convention & Expo

February 11-13
The Roofing Expo

February 19-21
International Builders Show

March 14-19
RCI International Convention and Trade Show

April 3-5
NASCC: The Steel Conference

Inside CSI

CSI

ELEVATORS

I am tackling my first project with an elevator that is over three stories. I have been trying to get my head around the smoke and fire requirements for elevator doors. Does anyone know how to confirm if the existing hoistway doors have the required 90-minute rating? We are going the smoke curtain route for the smoke seal requirements.

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DOCUMENTING CHANGES ON CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS

Not everyone issues a ‘for-construction’ set – in many cases, the bid set, plus all addendum changes slipped in (or pasted up if not whole sheets/sections) is the construction set. When I do a new set for construction, I remove all clouds but leave all deltas (I like to change the deltas to a screened line so they are not too prominent - but still there). For spec sections I ‘accept all changes’ so they are clean, but make sure the revision number and date are reflected in the header or footer.

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