Channel high design: Part three

Small-missile impact-resistant channel glass serves as a beacon for the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) Museum of Art while providing critical impact protection.

Channel glass’ distinctive, self-supporting, U-shape makes it possible for design professionals to use glazing in new ways. The final part in this three-article series examines applications related to durability in the face of high winds, along with energy efficiency and colorfastness.

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Defining and Refining Polished Concrete

Hiperfloor premium reflectiveHC550-0142

French-American architect Paul Philippe Cret once said, “Of the many doorways we pass in a short walk, most are fulfilling their purpose, most of them are well-enough built. [But] how many are worth a second look?” Cannot the same be said about architectural polished concrete? Are your floors meeting your design intent or did you settle? Do you know how to distinguish between the floor you asked for, and the floor being presented to you during the punch list?

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Channel high design: Part two

A channel glass system wraps around the lobby and mezzanine of San Diego’s federal courthouse. Its curving form helps create an elliptical-shaped entry, which Richard Meier & Partners designed to be highly visible from all approaches to the building. Photos courtesy TGP

Channel glass’ distinctive, self-supporting, U-shape makes it possible for design professionals to use glazing in new ways. Part two of this three-article series explores aesthetic applications moving beyond simple curves.

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Channel high design

Single-glazed, staggered channel glass segments screen views while allowing for natural air ventilation.

As design professionals have grown more familiar with channel glass, many now recognize its benefits extend beyond harnessing daylight. The linear channel glass segments provide a depth and profile not found in conventional glazing, and can therefore be used as much to contribute to the art of building design as to diffuse daylight. The first in this three-part series explores the material.

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Are We Thinking About Daylighting All Wrong?

The daylighting advantages for this Manassas Park classroom go far beyond reducing reliance on electrical utilities—there is much to be said about natural light’s benefits in health and productivity. Photo © Sam Kittner Photography

Daylighting is an integral part of architectural design. After all, building occupants want a physical and psychological connection to the outside world. We evolved under sunlight; our Circadian rhythms—governing daily living cycles, influencing our mood, and controlling our sleep patterns—developed in response to a connection to the outdoors. Unfortunately, how many design/construction professionals approach daylighting can be problematic.

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The Ins and Outs of Revolving Doors

Figure 11

The built environment is an energy-guzzler. The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) states in this country alone, buildings account for 41 percent of energy use, 73 percent of electricity consumption and 38 percent of all CO2 emissions, and 13.6 percent potable water consumption. Globally, buildings use 40 percent of raw materials, or about 3 billion tons annually.1 Fortunately, the type of doors we select can have a big impact on a building’s energy profile.

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