Innovations reduce air leakage for energy efficient rolling steel door

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Until recently, air leakage was not a consideration in the rolling steel door industry. It was thought to be an impossible task—how do you stop air from coming through a door that is slatted? However, as codes became more stringent regarding reductions in air leakage, it started limiting the ability for architects to specify the best closure product for their application.

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Designing better commercial fenestration through thermal design

AAMA-Intertek_5694

Fenestration—such as windows, curtain walls, window walls, sloped glazing, storefronts, and doors—affects building energy use through four basic mechanisms: thermal heat transfer, solar heat gain, visible transmittance, and air leakage. Product designers, architects, and specifiers must reconcile the interplay of these factors to arrive at, or verify, optimal thermal performance.

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Steel curtain walls that get the curtain call

curtainwalls_Fountaindale-Public-Library---Courtesy-TGP

Modern curtain wall systems require structural supports as strong as they are versatile to keep pace with today’s increasingly large free spans, challenging angles, and sophisticated glass-clad aesthetics. While steel curtain wall frames have long met strength criteria, they have only recently provided the necessary design flexibility.

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Channel high design: Part three

Small-missile impact-resistant channel glass serves as a beacon for the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) Museum of Art while providing critical impact protection.

Channel glass’ distinctive, self-supporting, U-shape makes it possible for design professionals to use glazing in new ways. The final part in this three-article series examines applications related to durability in the face of high winds, along with energy efficiency and colorfastness.

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Channel high design: Part two

A channel glass system wraps around the lobby and mezzanine of San Diego’s federal courthouse. Its curving form helps create an elliptical-shaped entry, which Richard Meier & Partners designed to be highly visible from all approaches to the building. Photos courtesy TGP

Channel glass’ distinctive, self-supporting, U-shape makes it possible for design professionals to use glazing in new ways. Part two of this three-article series explores aesthetic applications moving beyond simple curves.

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