Innovative in-situ repairs of stucco-clad EEEs

Recent collapses of exterior elevated elements (EEEs) like balconies, walkways, and stairs have caused injuries and fatalities, leading to increased scrutiny of these features. Based on decades of experience inspecting and repairing these structures, stucco-clad EEEs on weather-exposed elevations are particularly susceptible to structural damage and catastrophic failure than...
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Primary seals are not secondary

A recently completed multistory building was experiencing significant water leakage directly below the interfaces of rising walls at setback roofs during prolonged wind-driven rain events. The building was principally clad with 150-mm (6-in.) thick architectural precast concrete (APC) panels finished by the fabricator with a 75-mm (3-in.) thick mortar-set...
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Being faithful to the mockup

When properly specified and executed, the preconstruction performance mockup of an enclosure assembly can offer several benefits to any project. Most notably, the mockup provides project teams the opportunity to observe, evaluate, and refine the design, fabrication, and installation sequencing of the enclosure assemblies and corresponding interface conditions.
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Repointing: Less is not always more

When repointing mortar joints in an existing structure, successful long-term performance depends on a number of factors. A lack of understanding of substrate materials and conditions, insufficient joint preparation, less than adequate skill or care during mortar installation and curing, and an overly limited repointing scope can lead to...
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Five common failures in curtain wall installation

Curtain wall installation requirements, means, methods, and materials continue to evolve, yet many of the basics remain the same. Most curtain walls have similar installations, but differ on size, location, alignment, and anchorage of components. Here are some of the critical areas to focus on for a successful curtain...
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What lies beyond the veneer?

Water leakage through the exterior wall was reported at a 30-year-old, one-story commercial building in the Midwest. The building had been constructed with concrete masonry unit (CMU) bearing walls clad with brick masonry veneer, and steel open-web joists supporting a steel roof deck. The portion of the building experiencing...
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