Seattle airport expansion to channel region’s natural landscape

A design concept has been finalized for the C Concourse Expansion (CCE) at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA). Led by architecture firms Miller Hull Partnership and Woods Bagot, the project aims to encompass sustainable design and an inventive approach to enhancing the passenger experience. Courtesy Miller Hull and Woods Bagot

A design concept has been finalized for the C Concourse Expansion (CCE) at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA). Led by architecture firms Miller Hull Partnership and Woods Bagot, the project aims to encompass sustainable design and an inventive approach to enhancing the passenger experience.

The building’s first key feature is a performative exterior envelope inspired by the forest and the frame. Just as in nature, where the forest protects from the sun, the building’s shell modulates light and collects energy.

Inspired by the atmosphere of the Pacific Northwest, the concourse’s interior is an interplay of environments defined by both the local energy and a connection to the natural landscape. The more active public spaces are designed to reflect the textures and activities of the famous markets in Seattle and the region.

A marketplace sits at the center of the concourse with a bar and retail kiosks which frame an open seating area, signified by a busker stage for local musicians. This stage faces the grand stairs, which provides an activated connection to the restaurants at the mezzanine level.

The Port of Seattle, which owns and operates SEA, is working to be the greenest and most energy efficient port in North America, prioritizing the health and well-being of travelers and the environment. The CCE project is designed to apply to the Port of Seattle’s new Sustainable Project Framework and sets the precedent for all future capital projects.

Sustainable features include rooftop photovoltaics; fossil-fuel-free systems for heating and hot water; electrochromatic glazing for windows; dishwashing capabilities for vendors, reducing the need for disposable dishware; embodied carbon reduction strategies; low-flow water fixtures; and biophilic design principles.

The project is scheduled to be completed in 2027.

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