Best practices for design and construction

November 1, 2012

Images courtesy Joseph Crissinger[1]
Images courtesy Joseph Crissinger

When dealing with efflorescence, there are a few simple rules to remember.

Design

Construction

For more on efflorescence, see article by Joseph “Cris” Crissinger called “Why red brick turns white: Understanding efflorescence[2].”

Joseph “Cris” Crissinger, CSI, CCS, CCCA, ASQ, has almost 30 years of experience preparing construction specifications. As director of corporate specifications with McMillan Pazdan Smith Architecture (Spartanburg, South Carolina), he is responsible for evaluating new products, maintaining corporate masters, preparing project specifications, assisting in facility assessments, performing field investigations, and coordinating internal training programs. Crissinger is a member of Construction Specifications Institute (CSI), along with the Building Performance Committee of ASTM International, and the Design and Construction Division of the American Society for Quality (ASQ). He can be contacted via e-mail at ccrissinger@mcmillanpazdansmith.com.

Endnotes:
  1. [Image]: http://www.constructionspecifier.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/eff_Fig.-6-Brick-Paver.jpg
  2. Why red brick turns white: Understanding efflorescence: http://www.constructionspecifier.com/why-red-brick-tu…ng-efflorescence/

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